Hunome Perspectives

Humanness Perspectives

Latest blog posts

A line of people looking at their individual phones

Deep social rifts – the negative impact of social media on society

Something is wrong with the social networks we’re using today. The news has been dominated in recent weeks by moves from the big platforms that have made us all question their role in facilitating constructive exchange of opinions and ideas in society.
Inverted perspective from a glass orb

Where does perspective come from? – how perspectives can fuel human ingenuity

At Hunome, we’re in the business of perspectives. We connect them, analyze them, build on them. But where do these perspectives come from? The short answer is our members, but there’s so much more to it than that.
Woman considers notes left by other people

Why does humanness in decision-making matter?

The concept of putting humans at the core of our decision-making process is nothing new. From Kellogg development of cereal with feedback from the patients in the late 19th Century, to the introduction of focus groups in the 1940s
Many people on a video conference

Human-centricity is going to hit society in a huge way – WebSummit

We attended a WebSummit like no other in early December. More than 100,000 attendees from all over the world joined the largest tech event in the world, all online. Despite the occasional patchy connection, the breadth and variety of talks gave plenty of food for thought (and action), and I was encouraged to see one theme in particular emerging across the board.
human skills wanted - blog

Human skills wanted: pandemic reveals need for humanness in an age of technology

You can’t teach an old dog new tricks. Old habits die hard. A leopard never changes its spots. We’re pretty much set in our ways if we listen to the old adages, yet a recent report by the World Economic Forum revealed that 50% of all employees will need reskilling by 2025.
Humans pass each other while crossing the road

Understanding humanness – a brief history of Hunome

I grew up in dual cultures in a monolithic society. The experience of having to always explain my name, my background, my heritage, made me realize at a young age that people thought differently, had different expectations, ideals, values.  Our humanness is fascinating.